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Misha
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Joined: Aug 02, 2006
Posts: 704
Location: McLean, VA, USA

PostPosted: Thu Nov 30, 2006 2:11 am Reply with quote Back to top

I made my fair share of mistakes and then a few more in my first years of driving, and I still make them. I wrecked my father’s car several times. I can’t recall how many times I’ve fallen from/with my bike. At least once I glanced my death into the eyes, and I’m still wondering how I managed to survive without a scratch…

I believe that everybody makes mistakes, and this is unavoidable. More, I believe there is an infinite number of possible mistakes to make Razz . But, what I always did, and still do, is after every bad situation I have on the road, I think of what I did wrong and what I could have done differently to avoid it. In other words I’m trying to learn my lesson and to remove this particular mistake from the list of mistakes I'm prone to, so I don't repeat it in future. And I strongly believe this is why I had my last serious accident in 80th, and my last at fault accident in mid 90th .
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sindhu
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Joined: Dec 24, 2009
Posts: 52

PostPosted: Fri Dec 25, 2009 12:59 pm Reply with quote Back to top

The top ten most common mistakes by teenagers are:

1. Distractions
Being distracted behind the wheel: Cell phones, CDs, food and even text messages can pose serious distractions to drivers.Distracted driving contributes to 80 percent of collisions.

2. Taking Risks
Actions like ignoring traffic signals or school zone signs and changing lanes without checking blind spots are all considered “risky behavior.” The difference between risky behavior and distracted driving is that risky behavior is deliberate, while distracted driving is often the result of ignorance.


3. Speeding
On average, teenagers drive faster than all other drivers as a whole. They will exceed speeds on residential roads that they interpret as empty because they haven’t had any close calls there. The Insurance Institute for Highway Safety reported that speeding factored into roughly one-third of all fatal crashes in 2005 when teenagers were behind the wheel — some 50 percent more than it did in fatal crashes for 20- to 49-year-olds.

4. Overcrowding
Teenagers frequently overcrowd their cars, cramming five or six into a cabin meant to seat four or five. The distractions of carrying too many passengers can have serious consequences as well.


5. Driving Under the Influence/DUI
When teenagers drink and drive, they’re even less likely to practice safe habits like seat belt usage: Of the 15- to 20-year- olds killed after drinking and driving in 2003, 74 percent were unrestrained, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Because teenagers are too young to drink legally, they’re also less likely to call their parents to come get them when they shouldn’t drive.

6. Following Closely or Tailgating
Maintaining a proper following distance is a critical step in preventing accidents. At 60 mph, a typical car needs between 120 and 140 feet to reach a full stop. Most SUVs require an extra 5 to 10 feet on top of that. Consider that 60 mph translates to 88 feet per second and it’s easy to see why maintaining a proper following distance is a critical step in preventing accidents.

7. No Seatbelt
A 2003 survey by NHTSA reported that 79 percent of drivers ages 16 to 24 said they wore their seat belts regularly, while 84 percent of the overall population did so. Approximately 21 percent of young drivers do not wear their seat belts regularly. Many young drivers have a sense of invincibility that also factors into teen speeding. Fortunately, many cars today have seat belt reminders that flash warning lights or chime until belts are secured. Call them annoying, but they help keep occupants buckled.

8. Lack of Driving Experience
Not being able to handle emergencies: Knowing how to avoid an accident comes with driving experience. Young drivers can only learn so much in the classroom, which leaves learning maneuvers like straightening out a skid or how to apply the brakes correctly to real-world experience. Speeding and distracted driving only make things worse, as they compound the lack of experience by putting drivers at higher risk of encountering an emergency situation in the first place.

9. Driving While Sleepy
Driving drowsy: Drowsy driving affects an unlikely group: the so-called “good kids.” That means straight-A students or those with a full plate of extracurricular activities. Overachievers have a lot of pressure. If they’re playing varsity sports and are also preparing for an AP English exam, and if they’ve been going since 7 a.m. and now it’s midnight and they have to get home, they don’t think, “I’m too tired to drive.”

10. Driving the Wrong Car and Not Maintaining It
Too often, a combination of tight budgets and high style leads teenagers to pass up important safety features for larger engines and flashy accessories. A teen or novice driver will opt for a cool-looking sports car rather than a car that’s really a safer choice. Then, if they sink all their money into it, they might be remiss in maintaining it.


Last edited by sindhu on Mon Jan 04, 2010 12:03 pm; edited 1 time in total
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FRE
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Joined: Oct 05, 2008
Posts: 79
Location: Albuquerque NM

PostPosted: Fri Dec 25, 2009 6:42 pm Reply with quote Back to top

That's a good list.

My (late) mother had a note posted on the refrigerator: "Learn from the mistakes of others; you'll never live long enough to make them all yourself." It was good advice. She wasn't especially good with the gearbox obbligato, but she was a good defensive driver.

Some people don't even learn from their own experience. When I lived in Fiji, I'd see drivers have a close call as the result of doing something risky, then they'd do the same thing again. Drivers would pass on blind hills and curves, barely avoiding a crash, then do it again and again. Once on a curve in a remote area, I had to hit the brakes hard to avoid a bicycle that suddenly came out of the bush. The car behind me was following too closely and almost hit me. However, he continued to follow too closely anyway.
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arun
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Joined: Dec 25, 2009
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 05, 2010 12:55 am Reply with quote Back to top

Not everyone learn driving the easy way. sppeding is not a problem until you are having the control over car.
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myownworld
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Joined: Jan 06, 2010
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PostPosted: Wed Jan 06, 2010 8:17 am Reply with quote Back to top

Yes, distraction I would say is one of the biggest reasons for accidents. Not only talking on the mobile (people still do that despite all!)..but sometimes, music, fatigue, and even random thoughts are enough to take one's focus off the road....and we all know, it sometimes takes just a few seconds for a crash to happen!
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sindhu
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Joined: Dec 24, 2009
Posts: 52

PostPosted: Sat Jan 09, 2010 10:34 am Reply with quote Back to top

"It is well known that human behaviour is the main cause of road accidents. Therefore it is important to try to improve driving behaviour. It appears from research and studies that the best way to achieve this is a combination of enforcement actions and, simultaneously, information to the public."
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sriram
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Joined: Jan 12, 2010
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PostPosted: Tue Jan 12, 2010 10:58 pm Reply with quote Back to top

Apart from the human behavior...Human fate plays an important role in accidents...If he fate has decided that your are going to die...Then you are dead for sure...
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tony12
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Joined: Feb 03, 2010
Posts: 18

PostPosted: Wed Feb 03, 2010 10:03 am Reply with quote Back to top

I can proudly say this.. NO PAIN NO GAIN. this obviously suits me. I used to be the worst car handler in my town. But after many accidents i learnt a lot and few months before i even did a 65metres ramp to ramp jump in my car.
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myownworld
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2010 5:29 am Reply with quote Back to top

sriram wrote:
Apart from the human behavior...Human fate plays an important role in accidents...If he fate has decided that your are going to die...Then you are dead for sure...



Shocked ?? You mean all that effort I put into my driving is no use if I'm fated for collision anyway? Oh...I don't know why I bother.....
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FRE
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Joined: Oct 05, 2008
Posts: 79
Location: Albuquerque NM

PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2010 4:33 pm Reply with quote Back to top

myownworld wrote:
sriram wrote:
Apart from the human behavior...Human fate plays an important role in accidents...If he fate has decided that your are going to die...Then you are dead for sure...



Shocked ?? You mean all that effort I put into my driving is no use if I'm fated for collision anyway? Oh...I don't know why I bother.....


Yes. That means that it makes no difference how we drive; everything is determined by fate. You might just as well drive blindfolded because if fate wants you to arrive at your intended destination, you will arrive there effortlessly, even if you don't have your hands on the steering wheel.
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myownworld
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PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2010 4:38 pm Reply with quote Back to top

FRE wrote:
myownworld wrote:
sriram wrote:
Apart from the human behavior...Human fate plays an important role in accidents...If he fate has decided that your are going to die...Then you are dead for sure...



Shocked ?? You mean all that effort I put into my driving is no use if I'm fated for collision anyway? Oh...I don't know why I bother.....


Yes. That means that it makes no difference how we drive; everything is determined by fate. You might just as well drive blindfolded because if fate wants you to arrive at your intended destination, you will arrive there effortlessly, even if you don't have your hands on the steering wheel.



lol..not the best idea in peak london traffic...but will definitely give it a shot! So do i keep both hands off the steering wheel, or leave one for safe measure..? Surprised
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FRE
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Joined: Oct 05, 2008
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Location: Albuquerque NM

PostPosted: Mon Feb 08, 2010 4:46 pm Reply with quote Back to top

myownworld wrote:
FRE wrote:
myownworld wrote:
sriram wrote:
Apart from the human behavior...Human fate plays an important role in accidents...If he fate has decided that your are going to die...Then you are dead for sure...



Shocked ?? You mean all that effort I put into my driving is no use if I'm fated for collision anyway? Oh...I don't know why I bother.....


Yes. That means that it makes no difference how we drive; everything is determined by fate. You might just as well drive blindfolded because if fate wants you to arrive at your intended destination, you will arrive there effortlessly, even if you don't have your hands on the steering wheel.


Ask Siriam; he seems to be the expert on fate.

lol..not the best idea in peak london traffic...but will definitely give it a shot! So do i keep both hands off the steering wheel, or leave one for safe measure..? Surprised
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myownworld
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Posts: 485

PostPosted: Sat Feb 27, 2010 5:07 pm Reply with quote Back to top

Hey, Sriram not fair how you've disappeared leaving me high and dry with my hands off the steering....! It better be my lucky day.....! Mad
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Misha
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Joined: Aug 02, 2006
Posts: 704
Location: McLean, VA, USA

PostPosted: Fri Mar 12, 2010 2:18 pm Reply with quote Back to top

Hi darling, your guardian angel here - you can put your hands back on steering wheel now, it's over Smile
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myownworld
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Joined: Jan 06, 2010
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 15, 2010 6:33 am Reply with quote Back to top

Very Happy see who needs to fear Fate with angels like you around! Wink

(btw. do you think it would be wise to put Sriram's theory to test...drive like crazy on road one day (blind folded of course!) and hoping fate will take care of the rest? Hmm.... Shocked)
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