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DaughterOfEve
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Joined: Apr 19, 2012
Posts: 24

PostPosted: Sat May 05, 2012 3:11 pm Reply with quote Back to top

I don't understand why where your hands are positioned matters. I would think you should have your hands where your most comfortable. For me this is a very awkward position. I get that you should have two hands on the wheel at all times I just don't get why they have to be there.
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Astraist
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Joined: Mar 27, 2010
Posts: 209

PostPosted: Sun May 06, 2012 11:51 am Reply with quote Back to top

The hands should not be at 10 to-2, they should be at a quarter to-three.

Anyhow, the idea of keeping the hands at either of those two positions is to keep them wide apart (obviously you achieve this better at a quarter to-three), which keeps your hands balanced and your control of the wheel - optimal.

Also, if you will need to take a sudden evasive action, you are not going to start moving your hands around the wheel. Instead, you will naturally just grab it and turn it around and the further the arms are from one another - the further you can turn like this.

A ten to-two grip is effective when your shoulder-width is too small relative to the size of the steering wheel and a quarter to-three position is too awkward. Otherwise, hold the wheel at a quarter to-three.

IF your seat is carefully adjusted relative to the wheel and pedals - a proper grip of the steering wheel should not feel awkward of cause fatigue, on the contrary!
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newbielearner
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Joined: Mar 27, 2012
Posts: 65

PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2012 3:55 am Reply with quote Back to top

DaughterOfEve wrote:
I don't understand why where your hands are positioned matters. I would think you should have your hands where your most comfortable. For me this is a very awkward position. I get that you should have two hands on the wheel at all times I just don't get why they have to be there.


@ DOE: I completely agree with you. It's so confusing, all this emphasis on hand movement.

I get so lost in getting it right all the time that it even takes my attention off the road, esp. when turning into lanes. My instructor said that I should not let the wheel 'spin' in my hands, but rather, use the 'pull and push' method which is so hard.

@ Astraist, cheers mate for explaining. You make it sound so simple! Wink
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Astraist
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Joined: Mar 27, 2010
Posts: 209

PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2012 12:40 pm Reply with quote Back to top

I appreciate the positive input but mind you, I was only talking about how to hold the wheel in place (an important subject, in my eyes). I did not refer to hand movements in turns.

When I give advanced training to drivers with an emphasis on car control, I do teach hand movements and steering methods, but for average or new drivers, all that matters in my view is that:

1. You steer with as few hand movements as possible - turning it as much as possible with each motion (rather than turn it in an endless series of hand movements).

2. Hold the wheel at ease and maintain that ease in the palms and arms while turning it, too. Particularly refrain from hooking hands and fingers through the inside of the wheel.

3. Turn the wheel positivelly, but smoothly, percisely and in a linear fashion. Do not let the wheel run freely through your hands.


Pull-Push, if you do it properly - by keeping the elbows down while turning and turning the wheel about 180 degrees with each hand movement - is a good way to start (even though I teach something else - but that's more advanced) and in some cars, mainly lorries, it is the recommended technique.

But, before you start working on holding and turning the wheel properly - ensure that the seat and steering are set to an effective position for optimum steering control.
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FRE
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Joined: Oct 05, 2008
Posts: 79
Location: Albuquerque NM

PostPosted: Wed May 16, 2012 3:00 am Reply with quote Back to top

Push-pull steering is fine for negotiating sharp turns and may be safer than hand over hand. However, hand over hand may work better for parking because you can turn the steering wheel faster that way.
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