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rw4952
New member



Joined: Oct 16, 2011
Posts: 1

PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 2011 7:39 am Reply with quote Back to top

Forum readers,

Age group 16 – 20 has highest crash rate according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), 2009 report. There are specific causes for these crashes. The causes are identified and a discussion on ways to be safer are in an E-book “Young Drivers Be Aware or Beware”. Also, since this age group is new to driving the E-book discusses basic vehicle maintenance that should be performed.
*link snipped
Thanks,
rw4952
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James98
New member



Joined: Oct 14, 2011
Posts: 3

PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2011 11:16 pm Reply with quote Back to top

I searched a bit of history for NHTSA. what I got I am poting here..this shows how effective it is..
Quote:

The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA, pronounced "nit-suh") is an agency of the Executive Branch of the U.S. Government, part of the Department of Transportation. It describes its mission as “Save lives, prevent injuries, reduce vehicle-related crashes.”
As part of its activities, NHTSA is charged with writing and enforcing safety, theft-resistance, and fuel economy standards for motor vehicles, the latter under the rubric of the Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) system. NHTSA also licenses vehicle manufacturers and importers, allows or blocks the import of vehicles and safety-regulated vehicle parts, administers the vehicle identification number (VIN) system, develops the anthropomorphic dummies used in safety testing, as well as the test protocols themselves, and provides vehicle insurance cost information. The agency has asserted preemptive regulatory authority over Greenhouse gas emissions, but this has been disputed by such state regulatory agencies as the California Air Resources Board.
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Astraist
Master Driver



Joined: Mar 27, 2010
Posts: 209

PostPosted: Fri Oct 21, 2011 2:07 pm Reply with quote Back to top

Having read the E-Book, I find it to be good, but very basic and perhaps even outdated. It only addressed the popular aspects of teen driving, like alcohol or distractions, instead of offering more practical driving advice. Especially in the lower level of driver's training and lower driving age, as in the US, I would see a book of practical driving advice to be more effective. Why not linger to disscuss seperation distance between cars (following distances), how to gauge the appropriate speed to the conditions, or how to actually be observant?

Even in the area where some practical advice was given, referring of course to the technical part, it was again outdated. In particular, I can point out the part on tires, which has not been given the stress it deserves or the accuracy it requires. Check once a month? Visualy check for loss of air? Check the tread with a penny?
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GerardWon
Master Racer



Joined: May 10, 2011
Posts: 46
Location: NYC Area

PostPosted: Sun Oct 23, 2011 6:49 pm Reply with quote Back to top

Astraist wrote:
Having read the E-Book, I find it to be good, but very basic and perhaps even outdated. It only addressed the popular aspects of teen driving, like alcohol or distractions, instead of offering more practical driving advice. Especially in the lower level of driver's training and lower driving age, as in the US, I would see a book of practical driving advice to be more effective. Why not linger to disscuss seperation distance between cars (following distances), how to gauge the appropriate speed to the conditions, or how to actually be observant?

Even in the area where some practical advice was given, referring of course to the technical part, it was again outdated. In particular, I can point out the part on tires, which has not been given the stress it deserves or the accuracy it requires. Check once a month? Visualy check for loss of air? Check the tread with a penny?


Really -- visually check for air?!? Wow that works if its like half full. You cannot tell if a radial tire is under inflated by looking at it.
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Astraist
Master Driver



Joined: Mar 27, 2010
Posts: 209

PostPosted: Mon Oct 24, 2011 10:14 am Reply with quote Back to top

My point exactly!`Even when the tire is half empty it's a subtle difference that most drivers can't even notice. But they say it...
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