Defensive driving site - your source of information and the place to share your experience
 Home    Save Gas    Forums    Encyclopedia    Articles    Polls    Videos    
Our Videos

Most Viewed Video How
How to sit properly while driving - Low Res

Latest Video Driving
Driving around slippery corner in Croatia

Highest Rated Video Driving
Driving in Moscow

 
Main Menu
· Home
· Articles
· Driving Links
· Encyclopedia
· Forums
· Highway Surveys
· Mapquest Driving Directions
· Sitemap
· Video Library
 
Drivers Info
Welcome, Anonymous
Nickname
Password
(Register)
Drivers Online:
Visitors: 26
Member Drivers: 0
Total: 26
 

View unanswered posts
View next topic
View previous topic
Post new topic   Reply to topic
Author Message
vitun
New member



Joined: Sep 08, 2010
Posts: 2

PostPosted: Mon Sep 20, 2010 6:23 am Reply with quote Back to top

Ford of Germany eco-driving training program

You can decrease fuel use even in a gas guzzler by driving intelligently, that is, using 'eco-driving' techniques. That said, most people don't have a clue how to go about this. Recognizing that hands-on instruction is critical for achieving the full potential of eco-driving, Ford of Germany instituted eco-driving training in the 1990s in cooperation with the German Road Safety Council. In this program, specially trained and certified instructors provide an eco-training course for fleet drivers and customers.

Eco-driving refers to specific driving behaviors that improve fuel economy, save money, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and promote safe driving. Ford says that for maximum fuel savings, instruction must be customized after trainers have had the opportunity to observe individual driving habits. Then coaching can be provided for more fuel efficient driving techniques.

Several master eco-driving trainers from Ford of Germany have come to Dearborn to teach drivers with the Pro Formance Group their coaching techniques. Also, Ford of Germany's eco-driving expertise has been used to develop a pilot program for certifying eco-driving instructors who will train Ford's fleet customers in the U.S.
Ford of Germany eco-driving training classroom

Pro Formance already provides training for Ford's 'Driving Skills for Life' programs aimed at teen drivers. Instructors typically have a racing background with intimate knowledge of a vehicle's mechanics and handling dynamics. They have hundreds of hours of experience observing driving behavior and communicating how best to maximize a vehicle's performance for fuel efficiency and safety.

Recently, Ford and the Pro Formance drivers conducted validation tests for the program in Phoenix using volunteers who were given individual coaching on specific driving behaviors. The Sports Car Club of America verified the results. Forty-eight volunteers participating in the four-day program were coached in techniques that included smoother braking and acceleration, monitoring of engine rpm's, and driving at moderate speeds.
Analysis of eco-driving

Drivers who took part in the validation tests turned in fuel savings ranging from six percent to over 50 percent, depending on their driving style and ability to master eco-driving behaviors. Overall, there was an average 24 percent improvement in fuel economy as a result of hands-on eco-driving training.

According to Curt Magleby, Ford's director of Governmental Affairs, Ford is talking with fleet owners first since they have large numbers of vehicles and drivers that could realize significant benefit from such training, Ultimately, says Magleby, all drivers can benefit from practicing eco-driving and one day it may be considered mandatory as part of all new driver training.

In the meantime, there's this tantalizing thought: Ford says that if every American practiced eco-driving and only got the modest EPA-estimated 15 percent benefit in better fuel economy, more than 22 billion gallons of gasoline would be saved.

Here's Ford's list of 10 eco driving tips that should help accomplish this goal:

1. Slow Down and Watch Your Speed
The EPA estimates that driving 55 mph instead of 65 means a 10 to 15 percent improvement in fuel economy. Also, drive at a constant speed since pumping the accelerator wastes fuel. Using cruise control whenever possible can help.

2. Accelerate and Brake Smoothly
Fast starts, weaving in and out of traffic and hard braking wastes fuel and wears out brakes and tires, more quickly. Maintain a safe distance between vehicles and anticipate traffic conditions to allow for more time to brake and accelerate gradually.

3. No Idling
Today's engines don't need a warm up. Prolonged idling increases emissions and wastes fuel. Turn the engine off when idling more than 30 seconds.

4. Check Your Tires
Keep tires properly inflated. Under-inflated tires increase rolling resistance and reduce fuel economy. It can reduce fuel use by 3-4 percent. Under-inflated tires also wear more rapidly.

5. Be Kind to Your Vehicle
Perform recommended tune-ups and keep the Wheels aligned. (*link snipped) Replace air filters as recommended and use a fuel with good detergent additives to keep the vehicle engine clean and performing efficiently. Consult the owner's manual for proper maintenance.

6. Travel Light
Avoid piling a lot of luggage on a roof rack and remove excess weight that makes the engine work harder and consume more fuel.

7. Minimize Heating and Air Conditioning
Use heating and air conditioning selectively to reduce load on the engine. Decreasing use of the air conditioner when temperatures are above 80 degrees can bring 10-15 percent fuel savings. Park in the shade to keep your car cool and reduce the need for air conditioning.

8. Close Windows at High Speeds
Don't drive with the windows open except under 50 mph. Driving with the windows open at highway speeds increases aerodynamic drag on the vehicle and lowers fuel economy.

9. Choose the Right Oil
Use good quality oils with the viscosity grade recommended in your owner's manual. Ford recommends SAE 5W-20 oil for most cars and trucks to provide the best fuel economy.

10. Consolidate Trips
Plan ahead to consolidate your trips and avoid congested routes that increase idling.

Thanks
View user's profile Send private message
shauna
Member
Member



Joined: Sep 15, 2010
Posts: 27

PostPosted: Tue Sep 21, 2010 1:01 am Reply with quote Back to top

I like to learn eco driving. In this way I can save my car's efficiency a lot. Is there any institutions in CA that teaches eco driving?
View user's profile Send private message
SafeTraveler
Member
Member



Joined: Aug 17, 2010
Posts: 29

PostPosted: Thu Sep 23, 2010 8:24 am Reply with quote Back to top

My car is rated at 11 MPG by the factory. By doing things similar to the tips you listed, I can get it to 21 MPG. I know that still sucks, but I almost halved my fuel consumption by doing it.

Another tip to add: coast to stops whenever possible. This saves a bit of gas, and every bit helps.

Every day I see silly travelers accelerating all the way until they need to stop, then braking sharply. It's like they are racing against someone to be the first to reach the stop. For example, when they see a red light ahead, instead of conserving gas and coasting towards the inevitable stop, they accelerate sharply towards it as if they won't have to stop. I call it "racing to a red light" or "racing to the stop sign". Not only is this ignorantly wasteful of gas and brakes (nonrenewable resources), it pollutes the environment for no reason, it risks the lives of those stopped in front of them (by assuming that their brakes are infallible), and it tends to freak out the crossing traffic because they aren't sure if the car is going to stop or not.
View user's profile Send private message
Misha
Site Owner



Joined: Aug 02, 2006
Posts: 704
Location: McLean, VA, USA

PostPosted: Fri Sep 24, 2010 7:49 am Reply with quote Back to top

Coasting to a stop is soooooo booooooring, though most of fuel saving activities are Very Happy
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
ellaboswell
Member
Member



Joined: Apr 29, 2011
Posts: 44
Location: USA

PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 6:59 am Reply with quote Back to top

The best way to save gas is to not use the brakes. This means leaving a larger buffer between you and the car in front and taking turns a bit faster. Also try learning when the car shifts into a higher gear. For example my car gets better MPG at 43MPH (~50MPG) compared to 40MPG (~35MPG) because the transmission shifts into a higher gear.
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
myownworld
Site Admin
Site Admin



Joined: Jan 06, 2010
Posts: 485

PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 7:07 am Reply with quote Back to top

yes, I have been trying my best not to step on the break too much, but driving in the city centre, esp. at peak rush hour, it's next to impossible! Confused
View user's profile Send private message
Astraist
Master Driver



Joined: Mar 27, 2010
Posts: 209

PostPosted: Wed Nov 23, 2011 7:17 am Reply with quote Back to top

Misha wrote:
Coasting to a stop is soooooo booooooring, though most of fuel saving activities are Very Happy


Coasting to a stop or at least slowing down early and gently does not only save A LOT of fuel, it is also the requirement of safety. Imagine there is a queue of cars standing for a red light or obstruction of the road. Once you stop at the end of the queue you will be highly voulnrable to being shounted from behind. So. what is the solution? Simple. Instead of waiting at the end of "their" queue, stand in the front of your own queue!

Imagine there is a car a few hundreds of feet behind you, and more cars behind them in a similar gap. If you were to begin slowing down early enough, you would still be moving by the time that the car behind you catches up with you, and by the time the car behind it catches up with it and so on. This way, you are practically gathering up the cars behind you and bringing them to a safe stop. This is called "managing the traffic behind."

Idealy, you should get three passengers cars or at least on big rig to safely stop behind you. This is a good coverage from behind, which "protects" you from being shounted from the back, even as the vehicle at the end of the queue causes a massive pile-up.

The coasting technique is also particularly effective when you slow down towards a right or left turn lane at an intersection. In this condition, I've found that standing still waiting for the light or in a queue, if traffic on the main carriageway has a green light and is moving at speed - is a particularly voulnrable situation. If you are able to coast all the way untill it goes green, you maintain greater manuverability against drivers behind or besides you, should they have a problem.

I don't believe that one should totaly refrain from using the brakes. If you don't use them at all or nearly not use them, the pads might dry out faster, the brake fluid might degrade faster and the pads and rotors won't bed into one another. It also puts more strain on the tranny. The brake pedal is our friend, not our foe. The brake pedal also illuminates the brake light which help get the attention of the following drivers.

Furthermore, there is such a thing is beginning to slow down too soon. For instance, if you drive on a highway, you should only begin to decelerate once inside the deceleration lane. Slowing down on the main carriageway will delay traffic and risk your behind needlessly. Even at a red light, it's possible that if we slow down to early we would be overtaken or that the light might change back into green when we are still far from it.

When you brake over a long distance, especially in an automatic, it's reasonable to pause your braking effort once or twice for a second to allow the brakes to cool down slightly. As a rule of thumb, ease the brakes for a second for each full five seconds of braking.

Another final note: In situations where there is no traffic behind, it's a good idea to begin braking mildly enough, so that you are able to ease the brakes progressively as you slow down more and more and towards the final stop. This is a good idea because it's training your instincts for a situation where emergency braking is required. Most people brake too lightly and than have to add pressure near the stop and when you are taken by surprise during an emergency, your natural habits of driving will take over you. So, if we practice braking that begins hard and eases of, we would brake in the same way during an emergency.

Quote:
Today's engines don't need a warm up

True, but! The engine does need a few seconds for the RPM to stabilize and for the lubricant to reach all little corners of the engine. As a rule of thumb, wait about 15 seconds before touching the gas. Use this time to do what we call a "standing brake check" - always briefly check your brakes by pressing on them intermittently and than squeezing them down and holding them for a few seconds. This is tenfold as important in cold countries where brakes can freeze or be very cold and less effective, or with new pads or rotors that need be bedded in.

Once you got the car running, it's important to be extra gentle untill it reaches working temperatures. Press the gas lightly and shift gears early (in a manual). Once the car has warmed up - it's actually a good idea to work the engine up to higher RPM's every now and than, a so-called "Italian Tune-Up."

Quote:
Use heating and air conditioning selectively to reduce load on the engine. Decreasing use of the air conditioner when temperatures are above 80 degrees can bring 10-15 percent fuel savings


Be carefull about this advice. If the weather allows to not use the A/c or heating that it's fine, but don't refrain from using them when you need it! Being cold or hot inside the cabin is unbelievably fatiguing and distracting. Also, it's not a real save over time, because both the air conditioning and heating systems should be used periodically so they keep on working properly.

As a rule of thumb, operate the air-conditions for five minutes each two weeks, and the heating for at least five minutes each three months. The heating also helps to clear the air inside the cabin from bad smells, which are also distracting. Always keep a crack open up the edge of the driver's window for circulation of fresh air. When recirculating air inside the cabin, it's also a good idea to open up the windows periodically to get a gust of fresh air say, each twenty-thirty minutes.

Quote:
Perform recommended tune-ups and keep the Wheels aligned.


Get the car checked each 6000 miles or six months, as a rule of thumb (later if the manufacturer recommends so). Visit the tire shop at least as early as you visit the garage, to get your suspension checked, and your tires inspected, rotated and balanced.

Replace oils and filters at least as early as recommended. Oil replacement recommendations are based on a driving "profile" that basically involves cruising down a highway at cool temperatures and in clean air, and manufacturers are also inclined to delay the oil replacement intrevals to portray an image of better reliability for their cars. If you drive a lot in towns and in short trips, check the manufacturer's recommendations for "hard duty" oil replacements.

Fuel and oil additives should be used only if necessary, and only by selecting reliable brands. For old engines, it's a good idea to use a reliable fuel additive (like "Gold Label") and a quality metaloceramic gelatinous oil additive (like Xado) and maybe even flush the engine and open the oil pan in search of sludge.
View user's profile Send private message
myownworld
Site Admin
Site Admin



Joined: Jan 06, 2010
Posts: 485

PostPosted: Tue Nov 29, 2011 8:18 am Reply with quote Back to top

Astraist wrote:
Misha wrote:
Coasting to a stop is soooooo booooooring, though most of fuel saving activities are Very Happy


Coasting to a stop or at least slowing down early and gently does not only save A LOT of fuel, it is also the requirement of safety. Imagine there is a queue of cars standing for a red light or obstruction of the road. Once you stop at the end of the queue you will be highly voulnrable to being shounted from behind. So. what is the solution? Simple. Instead of waiting at the end of "their" queue, stand in the front of your own queue!

Imagine there is a car a few hundreds of feet behind you, and more cars behind them in a similar gap. If you were to begin slowing down early enough, you would still be moving by the time that the car behind you catches up with you, and by the time the car behind it catches up with it and so on. This way, you are practically gathering up the cars behind you and bringing them to a safe stop. This is called "managing the traffic behind."

Idealy, you should get three passengers cars or at least on big rig to safely stop behind you. This is a good coverage from behind, which "protects" you from being shounted from the back, even as the vehicle at the end of the queue causes a massive pile-up.

The coasting technique is also particularly effective when you slow down towards a right or left turn lane at an intersection. In this condition, I've found that standing still waiting for the light or in a queue, if traffic on the main carriageway has a green light and is moving at speed - is a particularly voulnrable situation. If you are able to coast all the way untill it goes green, you maintain greater manuverability against drivers behind or besides you, should they have a problem.

I don't believe that one should totaly refrain from using the brakes. If you don't use them at all or nearly not use them, the pads might dry out faster, the brake fluid might degrade faster and the pads and rotors won't bed into one another. It also puts more strain on the tranny. The brake pedal is our friend, not our foe. The brake pedal also illuminates the brake light which help get the attention of the following drivers.

Furthermore, there is such a thing is beginning to slow down too soon. For instance, if you drive on a highway, you should only begin to decelerate once inside the deceleration lane. Slowing down on the main carriageway will delay traffic and risk your behind needlessly. Even at a red light, it's possible that if we slow down to early we would be overtaken or that the light might change back into green when we are still far from it.

When you brake over a long distance, especially in an automatic, it's reasonable to pause your braking effort once or twice for a second to allow the brakes to cool down slightly. As a rule of thumb, ease the brakes for a second for each full five seconds of braking.

Another final note: In situations where there is no traffic behind, it's a good idea to begin braking mildly enough, so that you are able to ease the brakes progressively as you slow down more and more and towards the final stop. This is a good idea because it's training your instincts for a situation where emergency braking is required. Most people brake too lightly and than have to add pressure near the stop and when you are taken by surprise during an emergency, your natural habits of driving will take over you. So, if we practice braking that begins hard and eases of, we would brake in the same way during an emergency.

Quote:
Today's engines don't need a warm up

True, but! The engine does need a few seconds for the RPM to stabilize and for the lubricant to reach all little corners of the engine. As a rule of thumb, wait about 15 seconds before touching the gas. Use this time to do what we call a "standing brake check" - always briefly check your brakes by pressing on them intermittently and than squeezing them down and holding them for a few seconds. This is tenfold as important in cold countries where brakes can freeze or be very cold and less effective, or with new pads or rotors that need be bedded in.

Once you got the car running, it's important to be extra gentle untill it reaches working temperatures. Press the gas lightly and shift gears early (in a manual). Once the car has warmed up - it's actually a good idea to work the engine up to higher RPM's every now and than, a so-called "Italian Tune-Up."

Quote:
Use heating and air conditioning selectively to reduce load on the engine. Decreasing use of the air conditioner when temperatures are above 80 degrees can bring 10-15 percent fuel savings


Be carefull about this advice. If the weather allows to not use the A/c or heating that it's fine, but don't refrain from using them when you need it! Being cold or hot inside the cabin is unbelievably fatiguing and distracting. Also, it's not a real save over time, because both the air conditioning and heating systems should be used periodically so they keep on working properly.

As a rule of thumb, operate the air-conditions for five minutes each two weeks, and the heating for at least five minutes each three months. The heating also helps to clear the air inside the cabin from bad smells, which are also distracting. Always keep a crack open up the edge of the driver's window for circulation of fresh air. When recirculating air inside the cabin, it's also a good idea to open up the windows periodically to get a gust of fresh air say, each twenty-thirty minutes.

Quote:
Perform recommended tune-ups and keep the Wheels aligned.


Get the car checked each 6000 miles or six months, as a rule of thumb (later if the manufacturer recommends so). Visit the tire shop at least as early as you visit the garage, to get your suspension checked, and your tires inspected, rotated and balanced.

Replace oils and filters at least as early as recommended. Oil replacement recommendations are based on a driving "profile" that basically involves cruising down a highway at cool temperatures and in clean air, and manufacturers are also inclined to delay the oil replacement intrevals to portray an image of better reliability for their cars. If you drive a lot in towns and in short trips, check the manufacturer's recommendations for "hard duty" oil replacements.

Fuel and oil additives should be used only if necessary, and only by selecting reliable brands. For old engines, it's a good idea to use a reliable fuel additive (like "Gold Label") and a quality metaloceramic gelatinous oil additive (like Xado) and maybe even flush the engine and open the oil pan in search of sludge.



Thank you for this Astraist. Excellent post as usual. I really find your advice regrading breaking/coasting very helpful.
View user's profile Send private message
charn
Member
Member



Joined: Apr 03, 2011
Posts: 42

PostPosted: Wed May 02, 2012 12:13 pm Reply with quote Back to top

My favorite tactic is carrying a bike in my truck. It's extra weight, but riding past stalled traffic is very satisfying.
View user's profile Send private message
newbielearner
Active member
Active member



Joined: Mar 27, 2012
Posts: 65

PostPosted: Tue May 08, 2012 4:16 am Reply with quote Back to top

lol @ Charn! That's clever mate!
View user's profile Send private message
Display posts from previous:       
Post new topic   Reply to topic

View next topic
View previous topic
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001-2006 phpBB Group
:: Theme & Graphics by Daz :: Ported for PHP-Nuke by nukemods.com ::
All times are GMT - 5 Hours
Forums ©
 
Defensive Driving | Contact us | Privacy policy | Terms of Use | Texas Defensive Driving
Forums RSS Feed
NJ Defensive Driving | New York Defensive Driving| Fuel Economy



Page Generation: 0.11 Seconds
Fun and Safe Driving © 2006-2018